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Womens Health, Sex and Sexuality – Millennials and Self Diagnosing

Womens Health, Sex and Sexuality – Millennials and Self Diagnosing
MBL Editors

By Imani Brammer

We’ve all had moments in which our bodies change routine on its own accord, seemingly sporadically and without warning, causing a vigorous Google search freak out session— and rightfully so. We can’t bear to be abnormally wet, uncomfortably itchy and awkwardly smelly down there; such a topic is simply too embarrassing. By the time we’re done consulting with Google, we’re convinced that we have a brain tumor in our vaginas, no matter how much sense that doesn’t make. Like the millennial girls that we are, we allow unfamiliarity, discomfort and vaginal ignorance to drive us into vaginal shame, leading to unnecessary and unhealthy, self-diagnosing.

Vaginal shame: the moment when you’re shrouded in bewilderment and discomfort about your exclusive female part. It often comes with a feeling of shyness or even resentment. The feeling you get when you’d rather sink into a hole than discuss your vagina’s relentless and persistent itch, because you simply don’t understand it and therefore think it’s disgusting. Those moments when you run to the bathroom at least twice a day, meticulously cleaning your lady parts, because it’s capability to withhold what you label as filth, far exceeds your frustration capacity. The feeling you get when you know your odor is natural, (so they say), but you still really hope that your significant other just doesn’t smell it. And if he/she does, then…what does it smell like??? The feeling you get when you swear you don’t fit in with the other women who’s “pussy game on fleek” because, well you’re just not sure if your vagina has mastered that exact level of “fleekness” just yet. You wouldn’t exactly call your lady part a “bad bitch.” Does that make you a lady or does that make your vagina just bad? Not sure. But all of this, are the characteristics of vaginal shame.

Dr. Drai, known as America’s Ob-Gyn is board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist who’s also a nationally recognized author, speaker and consultant, said that self-diagnosis, the outcome of vaginal shame, is the problem of the millennial.

“You [girls] self medicate. You’ll let things go on forever and ever and ever and then talk to your girlfriends, then ya’ll come up with these remedies to do and then it makes the situation all bad. A lot of women just don’t understand vaginal discharge.”

The issue is, “millennials are reluctant to engage with the traditional healthcare system: Only 55% of Millennials (vs 73% of non-Millennials) said they would go see a doctor right away if they discovered a lump on their neck, while 38% would wait and see if it went away or got worse. Even if they do end up going to the doctor, they are more likely than non-Millennials to self-diagnose their condition (28%) or treat at home (36%) before doing so,” according to PR News Wire.

We’re so over run with an abundance of information at alarming speeds, that we intake information that we don’t actually need or what doesn’t actually fit our circumstances. In such a Type A society, we indulge in Web MD, wearing anxiety on our hearts and constantly running to Google to conjure diagnoses like some sort of magical medical calculator, carefully creating an issue that’ll perfectly match our worry. While we tap into Internet remedies, we tap out of accurate diagnoses from actual doctors. Dr. Drai calls us, “disaster people,” as we cause more disaster than solve. Everyone from the ages of 18-32 is classified as The Worry Generation, according to the Millennial Mindset October 2014 special report.

“You have to understand that you can’t compare your vagina to somebody else’s. Everyone has different stuff. Sometimes things are uneven. That’s normal. That’s how you’re made,” Dr. Drai said. “They do that all the time. They come in and say, ‘well my girlfriend said…’ Your girlfriend, is she a doctor? Well don’t listen to her.”

The key to staying calm about our bodily changes is to simply understand it.

“Your vaginal discharge is going to change every day of your cycle. Your discharge gets a little bit thicker during ovulation, when you’re going to release an egg. Everything is physiologic. That’s how the body is made. I always tell the girls leave it alone. This is how you’re made. Stop,” Dr. Drai said.

Millennial women, here is a wake up call from America’s Ob-Gyn. Stop comparing, understand your body, have patience, see a GYN, and lay off of Google.

“You can turn to Dr. Google, or you can turn to Dr. Drai. You choose,” Dr. Drai said.

Sip some of this medical tea, and be easy ladies.

Find Dr. Drai here. www.drdrai.com

http://www.facebook.com/DrDraiOBGYN                              

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Imani Brammer  is a passionate writer as well as YouTube personality. You can find her YouTube here: http://bit.ly/1t3UQ2c).